Robin Williams Sleeping 18 Hours A Day In Dark Depression Before His Suicide – Report

Robin Williams Sleeping 18 Hours A Day In Dark Depression Before His Suicide - Report

It’s been less than a week since Robin Williams died, but the speculation surrounding his death has already reached fever pitch. I guess we all want to know why such a brilliant, funny, and caring man killed himself, although logically, we can understand that he was depressed and couldn’t help it.

Radar Online reports that Robin was in such deep depression in the days leading up to his suicide that he was sleeping almost 18 hours a day. Radar’s source explains, “Robin had been suffering from depression and would often sleep a majority of the day and night. He wasn’t eating and was just having problems getting out of bed. He would often complain that he was just so tired, even after sleeping 20 hours.”

It’s a common complaint from people suffering depression, and it’s even more astonishing that people close to him didn’t see the signs and get him help straight away. For that reason, I have a hard time believing that he really was exhibiting these kinds of symptoms, because wouldn’t his children and his wife, Susan Schneider, have noticed and gotten him help immediately? Or even if his wife didn’t notice, his assistant or friends surely would have? Robin was a popular man, and he had many, many friends and people’s lives that he touched – if he really did withdraw so deep into himself, I think someone must have noticed.

No, it’s much easier to buy the theory that he fought with his wife before the suicide, or he just snapped and made a split-second decision. Cutting his wrists and then hanging himself was obviously premeditated, but if it was preceded by excessive sleeping and lack of appetite, I think someone would have noticed and gotten him help immediately – not left him in the house alone, to his own devices.

Do you guys agree? Let us know in the comments below.

Photo Credit: FameFlynet



  • gr50

    gr50

  • gr50

    Your comments are logical, and many people share your same sentiments, but those viewpoints are usually the sentiments of those who have never been around a person who is suffering from chronic, debilitating depression. Most people do not know how to respond to their loved ones dealing with depression. Of course his family noticed. Of course they wanted to help, but it is simply not that easy. It’s not a bad mood or the feeling you might experience when things don’t go your way; it’s an internal void one is constantly looking to fill. Robin didn’t necessarily want to “die”. He simply wanted the pain to stop. Life seems tolerable enveloped in a 20 hour slumber. You wake up for a while and soon discover a repeat of extreme exhaustion and return to that place of safety. Robin could control his life while he slept. While he was awake, he couldn’t.