Australian Paps Looking To Get The Money Shot Of Baby Kidman

Sydney’ Australia’s paparazzi are salivating over the prospect of landing this year’s biggest money shot – the first pictures of Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban’s baby daughter, Sunday Rose.  She is one of the world’s most famous babies, and will get to see her mother’s home town for the first time after flying to Sydney on their private jet in the next few days.

The prospect of snapping the new mum and her baby means serious dollars for the dozens of "paps" who regularly camp outside Kidman’s Darling Point home, which the star is now trying to offload. Sales of an exclusive baby shot could generate more than $100,000.  It’s the sort of fee that tends to attract the serious paps, the ones who hire helicopters and use telescopic lenses to "shoot" their prey.

Reports from the US claim Kidman and Urban turned down offers of more than $US3 million ($3.2 million) to pose with their baby. But PS has learnt there are plans to take some of the steam out of the hunt with the star considering releasing a photograph of Sunday Rose in return for a little privacy when she gets back to Sydney. This was the strategy they used for their wedding.

Kidman, who shed her post-pregnancy weight in a matter of days after giving birth, has been regularly photographed in Nashville, where she lives.  She is returning to Sydney without Urban to resume work on Baz Luhrmann’s epic film Australia as well as inspect for the first time the family’s new $6.5 million estate in the Southern Highlands.

"Their life in Nashville is much more peaceful than whenever they are in Sydney," said one of Kidman’s closest allies.  "They have a property over there and it is very private. They are new parents and totally besotted with the baby. The last thing on their minds is how to handle the Sydney paparazzi."  Kidman and Urban are hoping to re-create their Nashville idyll at Bunya Hill, a 45-hectare cattle stud at Sutton Forest, comprising a magnificent circa 1878 Georgian mansion with wide sandstone verandas, pressed-metal ceilings, a carved cedar staircase and 10 marble fireplaces.

Locals say the property is beyond view from the nearest public roads, with dense bush to block prying telescopic lenses. The only vantage points without trespassing would be from the sky.  Source

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